IL FESTIVAL DELL’INDUSTRIA DEL CINEMA E DELL’AUDIOVISIVO
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
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K. DIRECTOR AND PRODUCER CALLS FOR REVOLUTION IN CINEMA INDUSTRY

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Lacco Ameno d�Ischia (July 14) �U.K. Director Peter Greenaway who is in Italy to
accept a top prize at an international film festival, on Sunday called for
the entertainment industry to break away from old-fashioned technologies
that are gravely handicapping the production and distribution of films.

"The great days of the cinema are over," declared Greenaway. "We have to
reinvent the cinema" in order to survive and grow with the future advances
in technological innovations.

He said the cinema as we have known it over the decades "died in September
of 1983 when the remote control was introduced to the world." As soon as
that happened, he said, entertainment became an interactive experience,
while the cinema remained for the most part a passive medium.

"Cinema needs entrepreneurs who have vision. We have to break away from
the 120-minute straight jacket," he told reporters attending the Ischia
Film & Music Fest which runs through Friday off the coast of Naples.

Greenaway was awarded an Angelo Rizzoli Prize for the festival for his work
in getting eight European nations to cooperate in the making of the film
"The Tulse Luper Suitcases." The film, which has many technical
innovations, will be distributed in Italy in September.

For the past 21 years Greenaway has worked with Dutch producer Kees
Kasander. "At the beginning, he told me that he would support my film
career as long as I didn't want three Elizabeth Taylors on an aircraft
carrier with a farm full of pigs."

Greenaway's "The Tulse Luper Suitcase" was screened at Cannes. Luciano
Sovena, general executive of the Luce Institute, a co-producer of the
Ischia festival, said the film "was revolutionary in contrast to its
competitors, but perhaps it was too brave to gain the Golden Palm or other
acknowledgements."

Greenaway said that today's films are seen 75 per cent on TV, 20 percent on
DVD and only 5 per cent in the theater. He is working on new digital
technologies for internet and DVD distribution.

Louis J. Horvitz, director of the last seven Academy Awards, traveled to
the Green Island to accept an honorary award and to screen the American
Film Institute's salute to Robert De Niro, which he produced in Los
Angeles. In his remarks, Horvitz agreed with Greenaway's pleadings for the
industry to investigate new and innovative technologies in the areas of
production and distribution.

"It is important to understand that the opportunities in outlets, such as
cable televison, is 100 times more today than six or seven years ago,"
Horvitz said. "For example, in the United States, there are 500 different
outlets to view what you want to see." The challenge therefore, he said,
is for the promoters to get across to the potential audience when the
production will be aired, on what station, the date and the time.

Horvitz, who is Cuban, studied filmmaking at UCLA in Los Angeles.

Bollywood�s Kabir Bebi returns to Ischia�the First Star to Arrive. On the Island for the Global Film and Music Fest; Greeted by Academy President Carriero

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Lacco Ameno d�Ischia (July 14) - Kabir Bedi, the Bollywood star leading the return of Golden Age greats to the Ischia Global Film and Music Fest, said on his arrival Saturday that �to work in the new Indian cinema is fantastic. It is creative anarchy, not the bureaucracy of Hollywood.�

The international superstar talked about the Bollywood that has become one of the world�s great cinema factories with more than 800 films a year being produced. He is Bollywood�s most popular star in Italy because in the 1970s, early in his career, he played the character Sandokan in a wildly popular TV series that was produced in Italy.

He is the first of many stars to return to Ischia for this week�s festival on the Green Island off Naples. A major focus of the festival is the phenomenon of Bollywood. Many other on-camera and behind-the-camera leaders of the Bombay film community will attend.

Bedi said he soon will be in Sicily to star in an updated Sandokan film being co-produced with Gherardo Pagliei and The Luce Institute ��I hope the first of a long series. I will interpret myself, an actor loved in Italy and loved above all by the young Sicilian daughter of a boss. We have already made the inspections. Sicily is a fantastic place and to work with the Italians is optimal thing. We are very similar. You are creative and freer than the Americans, less rigid and more ready to launch an adventure.� He went on to criticize the Hollywood film community as a stifling entertainment industry where it takes years to launch a project�if it ever gets off the ground--unlike Bombay where the process is fast and relatively easy.

Bedi, in Ischia with his English wife Niki, said: �I did not expect much interest when I saw old television film of Sandoka But it does not seem as if much time has passed. The spirit has remained the same.�

Bedi also has played a villain opposite Roger Moore�s James Bond in Octopussy �even if for me Bond will always be �Sean� Connery. I have worked a lot in Los Angeles. The role of Sandokan has opened many doors for me. In Bombay, I have done theater and much television. In the future I hope to direct.�

When Bedi arrived by boat to the Regina Isabella Hotel, headquarters of the festival, he was greeted by a group of VIP hosts and journalists, including
Giancarlo Carriero, president of the Ischia International Arts Academy.

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ITALIAN MOVIE CULTURE SALUTES THE 2003 RIZZOLI AWARD TO "THE TULSE LUPER'S" AUTHOR. AND THE ACADEMY AWARD TV DIRECTOR LOUIS J.HORVITZ ANNOUNCES THE 2004 OSCAR GALA

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Lacco Ameno d'schia, Italy (July 14) - Director Peter Greenaway who is in Italy to
accept a top Award at the Ischia Global Film & Music Fest, on Sunday called for
the entertainment industry to break away from old-fashioned technologies
that are gravely handicapping the production and distribution of films.

"The great days of the cinema are over" declared Greenaway. "We have to
reinvent the cinema? in order to survive and grow with the future advances
in technological innovations.

He said the cinema as we have known it over the decades ?died in September
of 1983 when the remote control was introduced to the world.? As soon as
that happened, he said, entertainment became an interactive experience,
while the cinema remained for the most part a passive medium.

?Cinema needs entrepreneurs who have vision. We have to break away from
the 120-minute straight jacket,? he told reporters attending the Ischia
Film & Music Fest which runs through Friday off the coast of Naples.

Greenaway was awarded an Angelo Rizzoli Prize for the festival for his work
in getting eight European nations to cooperate in the making of the film
?The Tulse Luper Suitcases.? The film, which has many technical
innovations, will be distributed in Italy in September.

For the past 21 years Greenaway has worked with Dutch producer Kees
Kasander. ?At the beginning, he told me that he would support my film
career as long as I didn?t want three Elizabeth Taylors on an aircraft
carrier with a farm full of pigs.?

Greenaway?s ?The Tulse Luper Suitcase? was screened at Cannes. Luciano
Sovena, general executive of the Luce Institute, a co-producer of the
Ischia festival, said the film ?was revolutionary in contrast to its
competitors, but perhaps it was too brave to gain the Golden Palm or other
acknowledgements.?

Greenaway said that today?s films are seen 75 per cent on TV, 20 percent on
DVD and only 5 per cent in the theater. He is working on new digital
technologies for internet and DVD distribution.

Louis J. Horvitz, director of the last seven Academy Awards, traveled to
the Green Island to accept an honorary award and to screen the American
Film Institute?s salute to Robert De Niro, which he produced in Los
Angeles. In his remarks, Horvitz agreed with Greenaway?s pleadings for the
industry to investigate new and innovative technologies in the areas of
production and distribution.

?It is important to understand that the opportunities in outlets, such as
cable televison, is 100 times more today than six or seven years ago,?
Horvitz said. ?For example, in the United States, there are 500 different
outlets to view what you want to see.? The challenge therefore, he said,
is for the promoters to get across to the potential audience when the
production will be aired, on what station, the date and the time.

Horvitz, who is Cuban, studied filmmaking at UCLA in Los Angeles

Bollywood’s Kabir Bebi returns to Ischia—the First Star to Arrive On the Island for the Global Film and Music Fest; Greeted by Academy President Carriero

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Lacco Ameno d’Ischia, Italy (12 luglio) --Kabir Bedi, the Bollywood star leading the return of Golden Age greats to the Ischia Global Film and Music Fest, said on his arrival Saturday that “to work in the new Indian cinema is fantastic. It is creative anarchy, not the bureaucracy of Hollywood.”

The international superstar talked about the Bollywood that has become one of the world’s great cinema factories with more than 800 films a year being produced. He is Bollywood’s most popular star in Italy because in the 1970s, early in his career, he played the character Sandokan in a wildly popular TV series that was produced in Italy.

He is the first of many stars to return to Ischia for this week’s festival on the Green Island off Naples. A major focus of the festival is the phenomenon of Bollywood. Many other on-camera and behind-the-camera leaders of the Bombay film community will attend.

Bedi said he soon will be in Sicily to star in an updated Sandokan film being co-produced with Gherardo Pagliei and The Luce Institute —“I hope the first of a long series. I will interpret myself, an actor loved in Italy and loved above all by the young Sicilian daughter of a boss. We have already made the inspections. Sicily is a fantastic place and to work with the Italians is optimal thing. We are very similar. You are creative and freer than the Americans, less rigid and more ready to launch an adventure.” He went on to criticize the Hollywood film community as a stifling entertainment industry where it takes years to launch a project—if it ever gets off the ground--unlike Bombay where the process is fast and relatively easy.

Bedi, in Ischia with his English wife Niki, said: “I did not expect much interest when I saw old television film of Sandoka But it does not seem as if much time has passed. The spirit has remained the same.”

Bedi also has played a villain opposite Roger Moore’s James Bond in Octopussy “even if for me Bond will always be “Sean” Connery. I have worked a lot in Los Angeles. The role of Sandokan has opened many doors for me. In Bombay, I have done theater and much television. In the future I hope to direct.”

When Bedi arrived by boat to the Regina Isabella Hotel, headquarters of the festival, he was greeted by a group of VIP hosts and journalists, including
Giancarlo Carriero, president of the Ischia International Arts Academy.

THE ACADEMY STARTED THE FINAL COUNT-DOWN. TOMORROW THE FIRST VIP'S ARRIVAL. ON SUNDAY THE ANGELO RIZZOLI AWARD PRESENTATION. ON MONDAY THE ISTITUTO LUCE CONGRESS

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